Kindred Nutrition

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Insightful Intern: Meet Maryellen

We've been so lucky at Kindred Nutrition this year to have two great interns. Read below to see how a student athlete views her experience so far at Kindred Nutrition. We can't wait to follow her season this year!

I’m Maryellen Hauver and I am one of the interns spending time at Kindred Nutrition this summer.
I just completed my sophomore year at Bridgewater College, studying Nutritional Science. As I got into my major at school, I began to consider what job I would like to use my degree for after school. In my classes I mostly heard about working as a Registered Dietitian. Before choosing this as my career of pursuit, I wanted to get some experience that would help me understand exactly what the job entails. Knowing that I would be home for the summer, I did some research about dietitians in the Frederick area. Through the magic of Google, I found Amy! I also discovered this blog and saw that she had taken college student interns in the past. It appeared to be the perfect opportunity, so I contacted her last fall in hopes of gaining this wonderful experience. We did an interview while I was home on Winter Break. Then this spring, I was so thrilled to find out that I would be spending my summer shadowing Amy and Dawn in the office!

Before I share my reflections and impressions of my experience so far, I will share a little about myself. I’m a student athlete at Bridgewater. I run cross country and track. Running keeps me busy year round, but I really enjoy it. I’m a middle distance runner, focusing primarily on the 800. Cross country in the fall helps me build my strength. Then during track in the winter and spring I work more on speed. My life as an athlete in college has taught me a lot about the importance of nutrition in sport performance. I have always been fascinated with food, but understanding the application of food to my daily life, activity, and health has been especially interesting.

There are so many different ways food and nutrition touches our lives. Last summer I worked at a farm where you can pick your own berries in the summer. This summer I am working at a catering company. The farm gave me insight into how our food is grown and also challenged me to think about the different ways food gets to our table. The catering company has given me insight into the many ways our food is prepared and served. It’s also made me consider how food encourages fellowship and how we use it to gather together in times of celebration.

There is just so much to food! I find it so interesting. This internship is giving me a deeper understanding of how we relate to food and how food nourishes us. It has also shown me how a Registered Dietitian can help people by sharing their knowledge about the science of food and the body. It’s been amazing to observe Amy and Dawn as they listen to clients, address problems, give advice, provide encouragement, and develop solutions.


I’ve been so inspired by all that Amy and Dawn do. It has definitely confirmed that this is the career I want to pursue!

In Good Health,

Maryellen Hauver

Thursday, July 7, 2016

Insightful Intern - Eating to Lose Weight

In order to lose weight, we often are told that energy out must be greater than energy in.   In other words, calories taken in must be less than the calories we use in all of our daily activities.  So, to lose weight we cut calories and try to increase activity.  (Granted, there is more to weight loss/maintenance than just an exchange in energy.  What if we cut too many calories or don’t eat enough?

Since I started at Kindred Nutrition, I’ve heard many of Amy’s or Dawn’s clients talk about how they’ve cut back on calories to lose weight but have hit a weight-loss plateau.  Many a time when a client discusses this occurrence, we eventually come to the conclusion that the client is not eating enough.  This probably sounds foreign but you do need to eat in order to lose weight!  If you’re not eating enough your body goes into “starvation mode.”   Then whenever you do eat your body automatically stores those calories as fat because it is worried that it is not going to get enough calories to carry out your daily activities.

In no way am I relaying that you shouldn’t cut back on calories to lose weight, however, there is a limit on how much one should be cutting back.  Something else I find to be prudent to mention since I’ve heard so much about the benefits of cutting out carbohydrates from ones diet in order to achieve weight loss is the fact that your body NEEDS carbohydrates for survival.  Speaking bluntly, if you don’t eat carbohydrates you will die.  In popular media carbohydrates are time and again depicted as the enemy and an obstacle in losing weight when in reality they are absolutely necessary to your overall health and body function.  Carbohydrates and calories are our good friends, in moderation, so that we may fuel our bodies.

If you have any question on what your needs are given your current lifestyle, Kindred Nutrition offers something called a Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR) test.  All you need to do in order to take this test is breathe into a tube for seven to ten minutes and once completed it will tell you exactly how many calories your body actually burns while you are sedentary or at rest, from there it will calculate how many calories you should be consuming to either lose or maintain your weight.  With this extremely accurate test you will also be provided with a lot of interesting information which could really aid you in either losing or maintaining your weight.  For example, this test also lets you know how many calories you would burn doing thirty minutes of exercise at a moderate level, how many calories you burn performing daily activities, and the fewest amount of calories you could possibly be consuming per day in order to avoid the “starvation mode”.  After completing this test, you could also speak to Amy or Dawn to see what types of food and how much of each type you should be eating to best fuel you in whatever you may be doing or working towards.  The numbers you get from this machine are not set in stone either,  if you are unhappy with the results or long for a better acting metabolism, Amy or Dawn could aid you in that as well. 


My bottom line: even when trying to lose weight, you need to be providing your body with all the nutrients it needs to be given so that it can be best fueled to perform the way we want it to.   If those needs aren’t met, your body will suffer the consequences.  A weight loss journey shouldn’t mean continuing to sacrifice the health of your body; it should be just the opposite.  While cutting back on what you are consuming just keep in mind you still need to be meeting your body’s needs. 

In Good Health,

Katie Wanger

Thursday, June 30, 2016

Nutrition Tips: How To Get The Most Out of Your Nutrition Visit

What a tricky relationship it can be with your dietitian, especially if you aren't 100% committed or if you don't really like him/her. Do you ever feel like you dread your appointments or that you don't think it's worth your time? If so you may just not be a great fit  OR you may just not be ready to change.  I tell my interns I can usually tell within the first 10 minutes of a meeting how successful someone will be. Sometimes I am surprised but usually I am spot on. I thought this would be a helpful guide for anyone who is thinking about going to a dietitian, has gone to a dietitian and had a "bad" experience, or is currently seeing a dietitian and not getting the results they want.

Tip #1 - Research, research, research.  Check out their website, check out their Facebook page. Do they have Instagram? Most importantly ask around. Has anyone you known worked with this dietitian and if so what was their experience like? How does the dietitian work? Will they allow you to call them and talk about their approach? Don't be afraid to research. You are hiring them. They work for you.

Tip #2 - Ensure you are really ready to make a change.  A dietitian, if a good fit, is going to assess your current lifestyle, current eating and activity habits, and basic medical history. Based off of the information you provide he or she will make recommendations to reach your goals. You must have an open mind to try what's recommended.  Remember a dietitian, not a nutritionist, has the extra training necessary to assess all of above and really structure the correct plan.

Tip #3 - Comply with recommendations. I tell all my clients that I wish I had a crystal ball that could assess how perfect my recommendations will be but it doesn't exist.  Remember you or your insurance are hiring this person to help you get to your goals. If you don't comply and come back with actual feedback it is very difficult to implement the right changes that need to occur to help you make the recommendations feasible.

Tip #4 - Follow up often.  In my 17 years of experience, I can tell you without a doubt that almost every client loses motivation about 10 days after a visit if they cannot assess the results. Think of your work as in investment. The more you follow up and adapt to the behavior and lifestyle changes the more successful you will be. This investment, although potentially expensive, will save you significant money in the future. Think of all the money you will have to spend on medications, specialists, and more if you don't reach your goals.

Tip #5 - Be honest.  I am only as good as the information I receive from my clients. Of course, I have many years of experience that help me ask the right questions, but if my clients aren't honest with me it will delay progress. It is not any dietitian's job to judge. We are working for you to help you reach your goals. We need to make plans feasible, appropriate, and help with accountability. If a recommendation doesn't fit don't be afraid to communicate that.

One of the most important things to remember with your health is that your providers action should be to get you to your goals and help you sustain them. Focusing on the above will allow a positive relationship that leads to success.

In Good Health,

Amy

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Nutrition Tips: Fat Isn't the Enemy (FITE)


We hear so much about carbs and protein.  Some people claim a high protein diet is the best way to lose weight, or there are people who insist everyone should only eat carbs from the low glycemic list. But fat doesn’t make the conversation much, and that’s because we all know we need to avoid it, right? Fat is evil.  Almost as despicable as gluten...but not quite. 

Dietary fat (I wish we could come up with a better word for this) is found in animal products - meats, dairy - yogurt, cheese, milk, and eggs, but we can also find it in nature with our nuts, seeds, and avocado.  Of course, our baked goods like muffins and cookies have fat are included in the ingredients to make them moist and tasty!  

Food companies have made it entirely POSSIBLE to eat a fat-free diet.  And why wouldn’t you want to? Fat (okay, I’m thinking of a new word now) has been demonized during the past few decades.  We’ve heard that eating too much fat, or any at all depending on who you listen to, will cause us to become obese, develop heart disease, and die a slow, horrible death.  So, they made available a plethora of fat-free goodies - fat free ice cream, yogurt, cookies, and milk.  We can also have a lot of fat taken out of our animal products - like our 80% lean beef.  Fantastic, right?

When food scientists remove naturally occurring fat from a food item - let’s say sour cream - there’s also a change in the amount of sugar on the nutrition label.  A serving of full-fat sour cream has 1 g sugar, but a serving of fat-free sour cream has 2 g of sugar.  Sure, it’s only 1 gram, but that’s PER serving.  And that’s only in sour cream.  The same thing occurs in milk.  So what have really gained by eliminating the fat (okay - I’ve got it...we’ll call it FITE - “Fat Isn’t The Enemy”).  More sugar.  Sure, we have less calories, but that’s not an equal trade-off.

Why am I even talking about FITE?  Because our bodies need quality FITE in our diets.  NEEDS!!  The fat soluble vitamins are absorbed via FITE from our diet.  The lining of our cells are actually made from lipids (FITE), and we need it for insulation and protection of our organs.  When we pull out the FITE, and add in more sugar...it’s not a choice that’s helping our health or our weight.
One last thing very important thing to remember...any dietary foods such as full-FITE milk or cheese is not automatically stored as fat (adipose tissue) in the body.  People hear “full-fat” and assume that means it will make them fatter.  Nope.  On the flip side, eating “fat-free” won’t make your body lean and muscular.  If you’d like to learn more about healthy FITE and how to incorporate in your diet, give us a call - it’s easier and tastier than you can imagine!!!

In Good Health,

Dawn

Thursday, June 9, 2016

The Insightful Intern - Katie Wanger

The insightful Intern: Katie Wagner – Bio: I’m a dog fanatic.  I have three brothers.  I love the outdoors.  I’m a huge advocate of good nutrition and exercise, but I am also an ice cream connoisseur of sorts.  Contradicting yes, but I figure balance is important in all aspects of life.  

How did I get here?

Upon beginning my junior year at Virginia Tech, I had set a goal to find an internship by the end of that school year doing something which would involve what I ultimately wanted to do with my life.  I was looking for something dream-fulfilling, if you will… Paid or unpaid – it didn’t matter to me.   I thought that if I could just find an internship I would better my chances at eventually being able to find a job which would aid me in paying off the mountains of debt I currently owe Virginia Tech (seeing as at this rate I will owe them my first born son) and I wanted to find something that might also bring a little joy to my life.  The only problem with this goal is that at the beginning of this school year I didn’t know what I wanted to do with my life or how in the hell I was going to find an internship pursuing my true passion and dream of eating butter pecan ice cream while rocking in a rocking chair with a big dog sprawled out beside me overlooking the mountains without a care in the world.  
   
Somehow though, I was able to achieve this goal.  No, I am not currently sitting in a rocking chair eating frozen deliciousness with my dog.  But, I am however at the Kindred Nutrition home office and one step closer to getting to where I want to be in my life.  “How did I get here,” you may be asking yourself. Well,  there’s a few events that occurred between the beginning of my junior year and now that I should probably tell you about. 

I guess I should begin with how I came to the realization of what I want to do with my life (besides eat ice cream and be a dog mom).  I have never been the type of person who knew what they wanted to do from day one.  I’ve changed my mind half a dozen times and through it all I have driven my mother (God bless her) up the wall as I have needed her constant guidance on what I should do or shouldn’t do.  One day a couple of weeks before the start of school we were sitting at our kitchen table and she was looking through Virginia Tech’s course guide and lists of majors.   Who knows what we had been talking about, but she turned to me and said “Katie, what about being an HNFE [Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise] major – you’ve always been interested in working out and eating right – you’d be really good at that!  Plus you would be helping people!”  And of course my response was “Wow mom!  That is perfect.  I’ll go see about changing my major right now!”   Just kidding - my response was more along the lines of “No, mom.  That sounds nothing like me.  I would not want to do anything like that.”  Something super dramatic and borderline rude like that. 
However, sometime that next week or so I started researching possible jobs which went along with having a major like HNFE and I came across dietitian.  I learned about what they did and how they help people.   A lot of people (myself included) sometimes just think a dietitians sole purpose is to help people lose weight by means of nutrition.  While weight loss is something dietitians can help with – their job description involves so much more than just that, depending on their specialty.  So I continued my research and ultimately came to the conclusion that mothers are in fact always right and I was able to eventually change my major over to HNFE without a whole lot of problem as I had already taken a decent number of courses it required. 

With that I began classes and found that I really loved my nutrition courses and thought I may have really actually found my calling.  Now the only problem was my awful procrastination and scatter-braininess that led me to about February before realizing I hadn’t done anything to aid me in achieving my goal of attaining an internship by the end of the school year.  So, realizing I only had about three months I began desperately looking for related internship opportunities in the Frederick area.  This is when I first came across Kindred Nutrition.   I saw that they were Frederick’s leading private nutrition practice and basically thought that there wasn’t a chance in hell that I would actually be able to intern there, but I knew I needed to at least try.  I was extremely interested by the services they offered and all that they specialized in.  I basically all out stalked their website and Facebook pages for two days before I finally gathered the courage to message Amy and see if they had any shadowing or internship opportunities.  Even if they didn’t I just wanted to get any kind of information or tips Amy could provide me with as to what it is like for her to do her job.  Sounds ridiculous, but I just knew there was so much I could learn from her and I wanted to learn as much as possible.  To my absolute shock, Amy replied and told me they did take on two interns for the summer and that she would be willing to interview me for the position.  Before I even responded I took a screen shot of her reply and sent it to my mom and we both had a little happy-freak out before I said I would really appreciate that.  Eventually we were able to have a Skype interview as I was still down in Blacksburg for school and she ultimately offered me the position.  As soon as I read this email I again took a picture of it and sent it to my mom and had one more happy-freak out before letting Amy know I could not wait to begin. 


So, that is basically how I ended up here.  Fulfilling my dream, if you will… No, I am not out somewhere eating ice cream with my dog children, care-free.  But I do think through my experience here I will be able to eventually live out another dream of mine to better people’s lives and overall health through nutrition and activity. It is only my third day here at Kindred Nutrition, but I already feel like I am learning a lot and am excited to see how the summer goes.  I look forward to giving you readers insight on my journey here at Kindred Nutrition if you keep up with me through my blog posts.   

Monday, April 4, 2016

Spotlight: Changes to schedule, New Offerings, and More

                                                            Changes to  Hours:

Kindred Clients please note that our evening hours will change effective 4/11/2016.  Our Monday office hours will now be 2- 6:30 PM and our Wednesday hours will now be 2:00-6:00 PM.  Evening hours are reserved for children in school or for adults that do not have a flexible schedule.  Please note, these hours are in high demand and a cancellation may result in an inability for you to get back into the schedule for multiple weeks. 



Kindred Nutrition will now have LIMITED Friday hours from 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM. For now we will only be accepting new clients into these appointment slots.

                                                                 Yoga

Starting 4/11/2016 Kindred Nutrition will host Yoga Therapy with Julie Hanson click here for more information.  To sign up please complete the information at the bottom of Julie's site or simply call 301-580-0008 to confirm.

Julie Hanson will also be teaching a Yoga for Everyone class on Tuesdays 11am-12 pm.  Click here for more information.  Kindred Nutrition will again host this class and the cost is $15.00 a class or $72.00 for the event.   To sign up simply call 301-580-0008 to confirm.
                                                                                                                                                                              

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Nutrition Tips: Serving Sizes


You’re at work.  It’s been a long morning, and you’re starting to get hungry.  You decide to pull out that bag of almonds from your desk drawer.  You dump a few on a napkin.  And you dump a few more.  You check the label - a serving is 2 Tbsp.  That looks about right, you decide.  You fold the bag back up and stash it away for another day. But here’s a question.  Why is a serving size of almonds 2 Tbsp?  Is that all you need of nuts for the day?  Is it a perfect portion for YOU?  

These “serving sizes” were actually determined back in the 1980’s - 1990’s after a group of researchers with the USDA surveyed Americans regarding how much they would eat of a certain food “per eating occasion.”  The average of the collected data became the serving size when nutrition labels became standardized in 1994.  So, basically, that ½ cup serving of Life cereal you had this morning was dictated by the rest of America.  Not science.  

Pretty interesting, huh?  I tell my patients to use the information on the label as a reference not a prescription.  For example, my 6’5” male athlete patient doesn’t need to stop at one serving of soup for lunch - he’s trying to get in a minimum of 3,000 calories every day as part of his training.  But, thanks to our label, we know that each serving provides him with 225 calories and we can build from there.  

One other thing to keep in mind - the food industry uses these labels for themselves, not for you.  These sizes give manufacturers a tool to inform us how much fat, calories, protein, etc. are in a given portion.  This does not mean anything in terms of meeting nutritional needs.  For example, a serving size of a bag of pretzels may be 10.  Don’t fool yourself into thinking that if you stick with 10, you’ve done something amazing for your body.  On the flip side, if you have an 8 oz. glass of orange juice in the morning, you haven’t met your quota for fruit for the day.  
 
When you’re struggling to find what servings YOU need, it’s best to work with a registered dietitian who can assess your needs based on certain criteria as well as working with your real life schedule.  By working together, you can best decide how many servings (or half servings) of any given food you need for YOUR optimal health and weight.  Guessing can lead to unintentional weight gain/loss, nutrient deficiencies, or unnecessarily avoiding certain foods.  

In Good Health,

Dawn



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