Kindred Nutrition

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Nutrition Tips: Fat Isn't the Enemy (FITE)


We hear so much about carbs and protein.  Some people claim a high protein diet is the best way to lose weight, or there are people who insist everyone should only eat carbs from the low glycemic list. But fat doesn’t make the conversation much, and that’s because we all know we need to avoid it, right? Fat is evil.  Almost as despicable as gluten...but not quite. 

Dietary fat (I wish we could come up with a better word for this) is found in animal products - meats, dairy - yogurt, cheese, milk, and eggs, but we can also find it in nature with our nuts, seeds, and avocado.  Of course, our baked goods like muffins and cookies have fat are included in the ingredients to make them moist and tasty!  

Food companies have made it entirely POSSIBLE to eat a fat-free diet.  And why wouldn’t you want to? Fat (okay, I’m thinking of a new word now) has been demonized during the past few decades.  We’ve heard that eating too much fat, or any at all depending on who you listen to, will cause us to become obese, develop heart disease, and die a slow, horrible death.  So, they made available a plethora of fat-free goodies - fat free ice cream, yogurt, cookies, and milk.  We can also have a lot of fat taken out of our animal products - like our 80% lean beef.  Fantastic, right?

When food scientists remove naturally occurring fat from a food item - let’s say sour cream - there’s also a change in the amount of sugar on the nutrition label.  A serving of full-fat sour cream has 1 g sugar, but a serving of fat-free sour cream has 2 g of sugar.  Sure, it’s only 1 gram, but that’s PER serving.  And that’s only in sour cream.  The same thing occurs in milk.  So what have really gained by eliminating the fat (okay - I’ve got it...we’ll call it FITE - “Fat Isn’t The Enemy”).  More sugar.  Sure, we have less calories, but that’s not an equal trade-off.

Why am I even talking about FITE?  Because our bodies need quality FITE in our diets.  NEEDS!!  The fat soluble vitamins are absorbed via FITE from our diet.  The lining of our cells are actually made from lipids (FITE), and we need it for insulation and protection of our organs.  When we pull out the FITE, and add in more sugar...it’s not a choice that’s helping our health or our weight.
One last thing very important thing to remember...any dietary foods such as full-FITE milk or cheese is not automatically stored as fat (adipose tissue) in the body.  People hear “full-fat” and assume that means it will make them fatter.  Nope.  On the flip side, eating “fat-free” won’t make your body lean and muscular.  If you’d like to learn more about healthy FITE and how to incorporate in your diet, give us a call - it’s easier and tastier than you can imagine!!!

In Good Health,

Dawn

Thursday, June 9, 2016

The Insightful Intern - Katie Wanger

The insightful Intern: Katie Wagner – Bio: I’m a dog fanatic.  I have three brothers.  I love the outdoors.  I’m a huge advocate of good nutrition and exercise, but I am also an ice cream connoisseur of sorts.  Contradicting yes, but I figure balance is important in all aspects of life.  

How did I get here?

Upon beginning my junior year at Virginia Tech, I had set a goal to find an internship by the end of that school year doing something which would involve what I ultimately wanted to do with my life.  I was looking for something dream-fulfilling, if you will… Paid or unpaid – it didn’t matter to me.   I thought that if I could just find an internship I would better my chances at eventually being able to find a job which would aid me in paying off the mountains of debt I currently owe Virginia Tech (seeing as at this rate I will owe them my first born son) and I wanted to find something that might also bring a little joy to my life.  The only problem with this goal is that at the beginning of this school year I didn’t know what I wanted to do with my life or how in the hell I was going to find an internship pursuing my true passion and dream of eating butter pecan ice cream while rocking in a rocking chair with a big dog sprawled out beside me overlooking the mountains without a care in the world.  
   
Somehow though, I was able to achieve this goal.  No, I am not currently sitting in a rocking chair eating frozen deliciousness with my dog.  But, I am however at the Kindred Nutrition home office and one step closer to getting to where I want to be in my life.  “How did I get here,” you may be asking yourself. Well,  there’s a few events that occurred between the beginning of my junior year and now that I should probably tell you about. 

I guess I should begin with how I came to the realization of what I want to do with my life (besides eat ice cream and be a dog mom).  I have never been the type of person who knew what they wanted to do from day one.  I’ve changed my mind half a dozen times and through it all I have driven my mother (God bless her) up the wall as I have needed her constant guidance on what I should do or shouldn’t do.  One day a couple of weeks before the start of school we were sitting at our kitchen table and she was looking through Virginia Tech’s course guide and lists of majors.   Who knows what we had been talking about, but she turned to me and said “Katie, what about being an HNFE [Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise] major – you’ve always been interested in working out and eating right – you’d be really good at that!  Plus you would be helping people!”  And of course my response was “Wow mom!  That is perfect.  I’ll go see about changing my major right now!”   Just kidding - my response was more along the lines of “No, mom.  That sounds nothing like me.  I would not want to do anything like that.”  Something super dramatic and borderline rude like that. 
However, sometime that next week or so I started researching possible jobs which went along with having a major like HNFE and I came across dietitian.  I learned about what they did and how they help people.   A lot of people (myself included) sometimes just think a dietitians sole purpose is to help people lose weight by means of nutrition.  While weight loss is something dietitians can help with – their job description involves so much more than just that, depending on their specialty.  So I continued my research and ultimately came to the conclusion that mothers are in fact always right and I was able to eventually change my major over to HNFE without a whole lot of problem as I had already taken a decent number of courses it required. 

With that I began classes and found that I really loved my nutrition courses and thought I may have really actually found my calling.  Now the only problem was my awful procrastination and scatter-braininess that led me to about February before realizing I hadn’t done anything to aid me in achieving my goal of attaining an internship by the end of the school year.  So, realizing I only had about three months I began desperately looking for related internship opportunities in the Frederick area.  This is when I first came across Kindred Nutrition.   I saw that they were Frederick’s leading private nutrition practice and basically thought that there wasn’t a chance in hell that I would actually be able to intern there, but I knew I needed to at least try.  I was extremely interested by the services they offered and all that they specialized in.  I basically all out stalked their website and Facebook pages for two days before I finally gathered the courage to message Amy and see if they had any shadowing or internship opportunities.  Even if they didn’t I just wanted to get any kind of information or tips Amy could provide me with as to what it is like for her to do her job.  Sounds ridiculous, but I just knew there was so much I could learn from her and I wanted to learn as much as possible.  To my absolute shock, Amy replied and told me they did take on two interns for the summer and that she would be willing to interview me for the position.  Before I even responded I took a screen shot of her reply and sent it to my mom and we both had a little happy-freak out before I said I would really appreciate that.  Eventually we were able to have a Skype interview as I was still down in Blacksburg for school and she ultimately offered me the position.  As soon as I read this email I again took a picture of it and sent it to my mom and had one more happy-freak out before letting Amy know I could not wait to begin. 


So, that is basically how I ended up here.  Fulfilling my dream, if you will… No, I am not out somewhere eating ice cream with my dog children, care-free.  But I do think through my experience here I will be able to eventually live out another dream of mine to better people’s lives and overall health through nutrition and activity. It is only my third day here at Kindred Nutrition, but I already feel like I am learning a lot and am excited to see how the summer goes.  I look forward to giving you readers insight on my journey here at Kindred Nutrition if you keep up with me through my blog posts.   

Monday, April 4, 2016

Spotlight: Changes to schedule, New Offerings, and More

                                                            Changes to  Hours:

Kindred Clients please note that our evening hours will change effective 4/11/2016.  Our Monday office hours will now be 2- 6:30 PM and our Wednesday hours will now be 2:00-6:00 PM.  Evening hours are reserved for children in school or for adults that do not have a flexible schedule.  Please note, these hours are in high demand and a cancellation may result in an inability for you to get back into the schedule for multiple weeks. 



Kindred Nutrition will now have LIMITED Friday hours from 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM. For now we will only be accepting new clients into these appointment slots.

                                                                 Yoga

Starting 4/11/2016 Kindred Nutrition will host Yoga Therapy with Julie Hanson click here for more information.  To sign up please complete the information at the bottom of Julie's site or simply call 301-580-0008 to confirm.

Julie Hanson will also be teaching a Yoga for Everyone class on Tuesdays 11am-12 pm.  Click here for more information.  Kindred Nutrition will again host this class and the cost is $15.00 a class or $72.00 for the event.   To sign up simply call 301-580-0008 to confirm.
                                                                                                                                                                              

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Nutrition Tips: Serving Sizes


You’re at work.  It’s been a long morning, and you’re starting to get hungry.  You decide to pull out that bag of almonds from your desk drawer.  You dump a few on a napkin.  And you dump a few more.  You check the label - a serving is 2 Tbsp.  That looks about right, you decide.  You fold the bag back up and stash it away for another day. But here’s a question.  Why is a serving size of almonds 2 Tbsp?  Is that all you need of nuts for the day?  Is it a perfect portion for YOU?  

These “serving sizes” were actually determined back in the 1980’s - 1990’s after a group of researchers with the USDA surveyed Americans regarding how much they would eat of a certain food “per eating occasion.”  The average of the collected data became the serving size when nutrition labels became standardized in 1994.  So, basically, that ½ cup serving of Life cereal you had this morning was dictated by the rest of America.  Not science.  

Pretty interesting, huh?  I tell my patients to use the information on the label as a reference not a prescription.  For example, my 6’5” male athlete patient doesn’t need to stop at one serving of soup for lunch - he’s trying to get in a minimum of 3,000 calories every day as part of his training.  But, thanks to our label, we know that each serving provides him with 225 calories and we can build from there.  

One other thing to keep in mind - the food industry uses these labels for themselves, not for you.  These sizes give manufacturers a tool to inform us how much fat, calories, protein, etc. are in a given portion.  This does not mean anything in terms of meeting nutritional needs.  For example, a serving size of a bag of pretzels may be 10.  Don’t fool yourself into thinking that if you stick with 10, you’ve done something amazing for your body.  On the flip side, if you have an 8 oz. glass of orange juice in the morning, you haven’t met your quota for fruit for the day.  
 
When you’re struggling to find what servings YOU need, it’s best to work with a registered dietitian who can assess your needs based on certain criteria as well as working with your real life schedule.  By working together, you can best decide how many servings (or half servings) of any given food you need for YOUR optimal health and weight.  Guessing can lead to unintentional weight gain/loss, nutrient deficiencies, or unnecessarily avoiding certain foods.  

In Good Health,

Dawn



Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Spotlight: Motivation Station

Remember back on New Year’s Day when the resolution to lose weight seemed like a fantastic, and certainly easily attainable, goal.  You were motivated.  You had a plan.  You were going to stick with it this time.  But now, it’s March and it’s cold and it’s gross outside.  You haven’t seen the sun in an eternity.  And eating salads every day is really boring.  You’ve lost the motivation to try.  Maybe next year...
Motivation.  Have you ever wondered where we get our motivation from?  Why are we motivated to do certain activities but not others?  Why can’t we tap into this part of our brain and MOTIVATE ourselves to do what’s best for us regardless of how we are feeling each day.  
Oxford Dictionary defines “motivation” as “the general desire or willingness of someone to do something.”  And to take that to the next step, the meaning of “desire” is “wanting to have something or wishing for something to happen.”  Wishing and wanting sounds pretty easy.  I want to have the abs of a 20 year old.  I wish I could run a mile in 8 minutes.  But where is my motivation to turn it from a wish into a reality?  That comes from another great word...commitment.  
Ken Blanchard, an author and management expert, has said -


“There is a difference between interest and commitment.  When you’re interested in something, you do it only when it’s convenient.  When you’re committed to something, you accept no excuses.  Only results.”


We know all about commitments.  As adults, we deal with them every day.  We have commitments to our employer, to our families, to our mortgage company. These are obligations that we take seriously - if we didn’t, we’d most likely be homeless and lonely.  So why don’t we keep commitments to ourselves?  We’d certainly be upset with our friends if they made a commitment to drive our kids’ carpool on Tuesdays, but only did it when they felt like it.  Yet we’re okay with letting ourselves down and breaking our own promises.  We let our interest slide away.
Make a commitment to yourself and hold YOU accountable to YOU!  No excuses!  Every day is a new day. Find ways to remind yourself of your promise to make healthy food choices and exercise.  Here’s a couple of ideas to get you started:


  1. Make a weekly menu plan with your best friend - brainstorm easy ideas together.
  2. Type up your favorite motivational quotes (Pinterest has some great ones) and tape them on your bathroom mirror, your pantry, at work, and your nightstand.  Replace them once a week.
  3. Get your friends in on the plan - form a “support” group and touch base with each other every other day or so via text or email.  


At Kindred Nutrition, we work with every client on an individual basis to find out how best to motivate, plan, and commit to realistic (because real nutrition has to work with your real life) choices.  Weight loss is a journey and requires patience and commitment - not just an “interest” in a healthier lifestyle.  We need to find the place within you that wants to lose the weight even when it’s not convenient, and we will work together toward that goal.  Make the commitment and turn that wish into your reality!
 
 

Thursday, February 25, 2016

Spotlight: Taking a Stand Against Non Licensed Nutritionists, Health Coachest, Trainers....

As I enter into my 6th year of practice I realize I face different challenges than when Kindred Nutrition was created.  Upon opening I battled with insurance, branding, and choosing a location.  I worked to create cohesive relationships with the medical community in Frederick and Montgomery Counties and value every relationship I have.  All were interesting challenges that helped Kindred Nutrition grow successfully into the community it is today.

The last year, however has had different challenges. The largest by far is battling all the misinformation that is provided by the internet,by those who are not licensed or educated to provide nutrition information, all the super claims, super foods, super pills and more. I could go on forever.

As I've published before, dietitians are so lucky to live in the state of Maryland. As of 10/1/2014 there was an addendum signed to our licensure that allows for civil penalties for Unauthorized Practice.  I have to ask myself though, who is regulating this?  I'm sad to announce that many individuals, practices, and groups continue to allow unlicensed nutritionists, health coaches,trainers or nutrition therapists to practice without the proper licensure or training and it's time to take a stand to protect my community.

As a Registered Dietitian and one who worked hard to graduate Cum Laude and complete my hundreds of hours of Didactic experience  I'm taking a stand to protect current clients, potential clients, and the general public. Kindred Nutrition will be focusing on providing written letters to include information about the laws to practice nutrition in Maryland to any individual or group who is not licensed to do so. From there we will contact the licensing board as appropriate to investigate the individual and practice and counsel how to move forward to practice legally.

Weight Management is a science especially if you have any additional chronic condition, inflammation, or just plain erratic eating. Every condition requires a specialist who is licensed, registered, and continues continuing education to ensure they have the most up to date information to treat their clients or patients.  A registered dietitian understand the biochemistry of the body and can interpret labs and counsel on diet and exercise changes that can assist with normalizing deficiencies and more.Those who are not trained to understand how your body works, interpret labs, or understand basic medications and contraindications are not qualified to tell you Macros, provide supplementation recommendations, or to simply tell you to stay away from sugar.

I'm looking forward to strengthening this community and collaborate with licensed individuals. Does anyone want to join our team to strengthen our field?

In Good Health,

Amy Goldsmith RD, LDN





Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Food Trends: Super Foods- How Super are They?

This article came to my email the other day and although it is short, I thought it was great. Often when cruising the internet, I read about the newest Super Foods and their claims. Sometimes they hold a little truth, and often times they promise the world with little collaborative thought.  What I liked most about this publishing was this quote: "But for virtually every "health food," there are potential problems along with more commonly extolled virtues."

We live in a busy society. Most of us have jobs that exceed 8 hours a day or involve incredible commutes. We have children, school, continuing education courses, the stress of taking care of sick family members, the priority to exercise and the time it takes to do it and more. We all, including me, want to believe that something will make life easier especially when it comes to health. This desire for ease, however, makes us become easy prey to incredible claims.

Often when a company is promoting a "miracle" product there is no further detail to help someone figure out how to introduce this Super Food to their diet or more importantly to assess if it's needed or if there are any contraindications. This article proves that often times a Super Food could have negative effects even if you are 100% healthy.

Some food for thought:

Nuts are often claimed to be a Super Food. My Endocrine clients particularly those suffering from hypothyroid or thyroiditis are often prescribed 200 mcg of selenium/day by their Endocrinologist. Depending on the time the doctor has with their patient, assessment of dietary intake may not be completed. This article talks about an upper tolerable intake of 400 mcg which you would go over if you ate 5 Brazil nuts. Symptoms of toxicity can lead to fingernail brittleness, hair loss, intestinal disturbances, skin rash, fatigue, irritability, and nervous system problems. These sound quite similar to the symptoms of hypothyroid don't they?

How about green tea? The polyphenols in Green Tea can actually reduce the absorption of iron, a potentially dangerous combination for anyone suffering from Iron Deficiency Anemia.

Until the internet is monitored and regulated for it's miraculous claims it pays to work with an accredited Specialist like a dietitian to discuss the addition or subtraction of any Super Food. This is especially true for anyone suffering from an autoimmune disorder or specific diagnosis.  Have questions? We'd love to hear from you in the comment section or drop us a line @ agoldsmith@kindrednutrition.com

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In Great Health, Amy

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