Kindred Nutrition

Monday, April 4, 2016

Spotlight: Changes to schedule, New Offerings, and More

                                                            Changes to  Hours:

Kindred Clients please note that our evening hours will change effective 4/11/2016.  Our Monday office hours will now be 2- 6:30 PM and our Wednesday hours will now be 2:00-6:00 PM.  Evening hours are reserved for children in school or for adults that do not have a flexible schedule.  Please note, these hours are in high demand and a cancellation may result in an inability for you to get back into the schedule for multiple weeks. 



Kindred Nutrition will now have LIMITED Friday hours from 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM. For now we will only be accepting new clients into these appointment slots.

                                                                 Yoga

Starting 4/11/2016 Kindred Nutrition will host Yoga Therapy with Julie Hanson click here for more information.  To sign up please complete the information at the bottom of Julie's site or simply call 301-580-0008 to confirm.

Julie Hanson will also be teaching a Yoga for Everyone class on Tuesdays 11am-12 pm.  Click here for more information.  Kindred Nutrition will again host this class and the cost is $15.00 a class or $72.00 for the event.   To sign up simply call 301-580-0008 to confirm.
                                                                                                                                                                              

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Nutrition Tips: Serving Sizes


You’re at work.  It’s been a long morning, and you’re starting to get hungry.  You decide to pull out that bag of almonds from your desk drawer.  You dump a few on a napkin.  And you dump a few more.  You check the label - a serving is 2 Tbsp.  That looks about right, you decide.  You fold the bag back up and stash it away for another day. But here’s a question.  Why is a serving size of almonds 2 Tbsp?  Is that all you need of nuts for the day?  Is it a perfect portion for YOU?  

These “serving sizes” were actually determined back in the 1980’s - 1990’s after a group of researchers with the USDA surveyed Americans regarding how much they would eat of a certain food “per eating occasion.”  The average of the collected data became the serving size when nutrition labels became standardized in 1994.  So, basically, that ½ cup serving of Life cereal you had this morning was dictated by the rest of America.  Not science.  

Pretty interesting, huh?  I tell my patients to use the information on the label as a reference not a prescription.  For example, my 6’5” male athlete patient doesn’t need to stop at one serving of soup for lunch - he’s trying to get in a minimum of 3,000 calories every day as part of his training.  But, thanks to our label, we know that each serving provides him with 225 calories and we can build from there.  

One other thing to keep in mind - the food industry uses these labels for themselves, not for you.  These sizes give manufacturers a tool to inform us how much fat, calories, protein, etc. are in a given portion.  This does not mean anything in terms of meeting nutritional needs.  For example, a serving size of a bag of pretzels may be 10.  Don’t fool yourself into thinking that if you stick with 10, you’ve done something amazing for your body.  On the flip side, if you have an 8 oz. glass of orange juice in the morning, you haven’t met your quota for fruit for the day.  
 
When you’re struggling to find what servings YOU need, it’s best to work with a registered dietitian who can assess your needs based on certain criteria as well as working with your real life schedule.  By working together, you can best decide how many servings (or half servings) of any given food you need for YOUR optimal health and weight.  Guessing can lead to unintentional weight gain/loss, nutrient deficiencies, or unnecessarily avoiding certain foods.  

In Good Health,

Dawn



Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Spotlight: Motivation Station

Remember back on New Year’s Day when the resolution to lose weight seemed like a fantastic, and certainly easily attainable, goal.  You were motivated.  You had a plan.  You were going to stick with it this time.  But now, it’s March and it’s cold and it’s gross outside.  You haven’t seen the sun in an eternity.  And eating salads every day is really boring.  You’ve lost the motivation to try.  Maybe next year...
Motivation.  Have you ever wondered where we get our motivation from?  Why are we motivated to do certain activities but not others?  Why can’t we tap into this part of our brain and MOTIVATE ourselves to do what’s best for us regardless of how we are feeling each day.  
Oxford Dictionary defines “motivation” as “the general desire or willingness of someone to do something.”  And to take that to the next step, the meaning of “desire” is “wanting to have something or wishing for something to happen.”  Wishing and wanting sounds pretty easy.  I want to have the abs of a 20 year old.  I wish I could run a mile in 8 minutes.  But where is my motivation to turn it from a wish into a reality?  That comes from another great word...commitment.  
Ken Blanchard, an author and management expert, has said -


“There is a difference between interest and commitment.  When you’re interested in something, you do it only when it’s convenient.  When you’re committed to something, you accept no excuses.  Only results.”


We know all about commitments.  As adults, we deal with them every day.  We have commitments to our employer, to our families, to our mortgage company. These are obligations that we take seriously - if we didn’t, we’d most likely be homeless and lonely.  So why don’t we keep commitments to ourselves?  We’d certainly be upset with our friends if they made a commitment to drive our kids’ carpool on Tuesdays, but only did it when they felt like it.  Yet we’re okay with letting ourselves down and breaking our own promises.  We let our interest slide away.
Make a commitment to yourself and hold YOU accountable to YOU!  No excuses!  Every day is a new day. Find ways to remind yourself of your promise to make healthy food choices and exercise.  Here’s a couple of ideas to get you started:


  1. Make a weekly menu plan with your best friend - brainstorm easy ideas together.
  2. Type up your favorite motivational quotes (Pinterest has some great ones) and tape them on your bathroom mirror, your pantry, at work, and your nightstand.  Replace them once a week.
  3. Get your friends in on the plan - form a “support” group and touch base with each other every other day or so via text or email.  


At Kindred Nutrition, we work with every client on an individual basis to find out how best to motivate, plan, and commit to realistic (because real nutrition has to work with your real life) choices.  Weight loss is a journey and requires patience and commitment - not just an “interest” in a healthier lifestyle.  We need to find the place within you that wants to lose the weight even when it’s not convenient, and we will work together toward that goal.  Make the commitment and turn that wish into your reality!
 
 

Thursday, February 25, 2016

Spotlight: Taking a Stand Against Non Licensed Nutritionists, Health Coachest, Trainers....

As I enter into my 6th year of practice I realize I face different challenges than when Kindred Nutrition was created.  Upon opening I battled with insurance, branding, and choosing a location.  I worked to create cohesive relationships with the medical community in Frederick and Montgomery Counties and value every relationship I have.  All were interesting challenges that helped Kindred Nutrition grow successfully into the community it is today.

The last year, however has had different challenges. The largest by far is battling all the misinformation that is provided by the internet,by those who are not licensed or educated to provide nutrition information, all the super claims, super foods, super pills and more. I could go on forever.

As I've published before, dietitians are so lucky to live in the state of Maryland. As of 10/1/2014 there was an addendum signed to our licensure that allows for civil penalties for Unauthorized Practice.  I have to ask myself though, who is regulating this?  I'm sad to announce that many individuals, practices, and groups continue to allow unlicensed nutritionists, health coaches,trainers or nutrition therapists to practice without the proper licensure or training and it's time to take a stand to protect my community.

As a Registered Dietitian and one who worked hard to graduate Cum Laude and complete my hundreds of hours of Didactic experience  I'm taking a stand to protect current clients, potential clients, and the general public. Kindred Nutrition will be focusing on providing written letters to include information about the laws to practice nutrition in Maryland to any individual or group who is not licensed to do so. From there we will contact the licensing board as appropriate to investigate the individual and practice and counsel how to move forward to practice legally.

Weight Management is a science especially if you have any additional chronic condition, inflammation, or just plain erratic eating. Every condition requires a specialist who is licensed, registered, and continues continuing education to ensure they have the most up to date information to treat their clients or patients.  A registered dietitian understand the biochemistry of the body and can interpret labs and counsel on diet and exercise changes that can assist with normalizing deficiencies and more.Those who are not trained to understand how your body works, interpret labs, or understand basic medications and contraindications are not qualified to tell you Macros, provide supplementation recommendations, or to simply tell you to stay away from sugar.

I'm looking forward to strengthening this community and collaborate with licensed individuals. Does anyone want to join our team to strengthen our field?

In Good Health,

Amy Goldsmith RD, LDN





Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Food Trends: Super Foods- How Super are They?

This article came to my email the other day and although it is short, I thought it was great. Often when cruising the internet, I read about the newest Super Foods and their claims. Sometimes they hold a little truth, and often times they promise the world with little collaborative thought.  What I liked most about this publishing was this quote: "But for virtually every "health food," there are potential problems along with more commonly extolled virtues."

We live in a busy society. Most of us have jobs that exceed 8 hours a day or involve incredible commutes. We have children, school, continuing education courses, the stress of taking care of sick family members, the priority to exercise and the time it takes to do it and more. We all, including me, want to believe that something will make life easier especially when it comes to health. This desire for ease, however, makes us become easy prey to incredible claims.

Often when a company is promoting a "miracle" product there is no further detail to help someone figure out how to introduce this Super Food to their diet or more importantly to assess if it's needed or if there are any contraindications. This article proves that often times a Super Food could have negative effects even if you are 100% healthy.

Some food for thought:

Nuts are often claimed to be a Super Food. My Endocrine clients particularly those suffering from hypothyroid or thyroiditis are often prescribed 200 mcg of selenium/day by their Endocrinologist. Depending on the time the doctor has with their patient, assessment of dietary intake may not be completed. This article talks about an upper tolerable intake of 400 mcg which you would go over if you ate 5 Brazil nuts. Symptoms of toxicity can lead to fingernail brittleness, hair loss, intestinal disturbances, skin rash, fatigue, irritability, and nervous system problems. These sound quite similar to the symptoms of hypothyroid don't they?

How about green tea? The polyphenols in Green Tea can actually reduce the absorption of iron, a potentially dangerous combination for anyone suffering from Iron Deficiency Anemia.

Until the internet is monitored and regulated for it's miraculous claims it pays to work with an accredited Specialist like a dietitian to discuss the addition or subtraction of any Super Food. This is especially true for anyone suffering from an autoimmune disorder or specific diagnosis.  Have questions? We'd love to hear from you in the comment section or drop us a line @ agoldsmith@kindrednutrition.com

Image result for superfoods

In Great Health, Amy

Friday, January 15, 2016

Nutrition Tips: The Importance of Vitamin D

Kindred Nutrition is so excited that Dawn Frick RD, LDN joined us in the Fall of 2015.  Our clients just love her and our thriving! Dawn's specialties include Gastrointestinal Health, Weight Management, Picky Eating and more.  Dawn really enjoys assessing our clients' essential vitamins, minerals, and gut health and practices what she preaches. Starting today Dawn will be tag teaming with me, Amy to bring you more of the blogs you love and request. Have ideas or questions you want answered? Comment here and we'll put it in the queue for the coming months! As always, we hope you enjoy our blog!


Just heard the weather forecast for tomorrow – a high of 22° F with30 mph winds.  Winter is definitely here.  I spent this weekend making sure our family is geared up to stay warm and healthy these next few months:  Hats? Check.  Gloves?  Check.  Boots?  Check. Vitamin D?
Well, that’s a work in progress for all of us.

            With many of our winter days spent inside hiding from Mother Nature’s wrath, we lose opportunities to get adequate vitamin D from the sun.  And we definitely need this important nutrient – and not just in the summer.  Vitamin D is responsible for keeping our bones and teeth strong by aiding in absorbing calcium.  Our muscles and nervous system need vitamin D to function properly.  While our immune system is working overtime to keep us healthy, vitamin D is a critical component in fighting off viruses and bacteria.  There’s been a lot of recent research indicating a link between autoimmune disease (such as rheumatoid arthritis or multiple sclerosis) and vitamin D insufficiency.  Also, I recently read a very interesting study that showed there may a relationship between vitamin D and IBS – particularly for those with IBS-D (diarrhea dominant).
         When we aren’t getting enough of this “sunshine vitamin” because it’s Antartica-cold outside, we need to look at our diet.  Some foods have been supplemented with vitamin D such as cereals, milk, or orange juice.  Other foods such as egg yolk and salmon contain vitamin D naturally.  When you visit your primary care physician, ask to have a vitamin D check during your next round of lab work.  If your results are low, schedule an appointment with one of us to discuss diet changes and possible supplements to bring your levels to the normal range. 

In Good Health, Dawn

Monday, November 30, 2015

Spotlight: The Time is Now




Tis' the season! Welcome to the Holidays. I believe it's safe to say it's some (most) of my client's hardest time of the year. Each year at Kindred Nutrition we talk about recipe modifications, goals for weight maintenance or loss, and how to just enjoy the holidays without feeling pressured to eat, drink, and be merry every.single.day. The most puzzling thing to me though, is that we move through these motions pushing off our goals to get fit or start a plan until the New Year. I think about this often and have come up with possible reasons why people tend to push this goal off.

1) Change is SCARY. Adults especially are set in their ways. It's scary to potentially change the way you buy your food, cook your food, and eat it. It's especially scary when you have a million other priorities you need to focus on such as work, kids, Holiday Shopping & Entertaining. I can't imagine starting something so different during this time either.

2) It's EXPENSIVE.  If you are paying out of pocket, nutrition counseling can be expensive. Did you know most insurances cover nutrition counseling? How about your flexible or healthcare spending accounts? They cover it too. Is the expense worth it? That's up to you, how many times do you eat out in a week. What is your discretionary spending? Can you flip priorities for a short period of time?

3) I might FAIL. What is failure? I don't believe anyone who comes to see me is a failure. A wise person once said failures are part of life, if you don't fail, you don't learn. If you don't learn you'll never change (unknown). Are you guilty of setting up rules that define failure and create fear?

4) It might not WORK.  You are right. It might not work.  That's why you should go to a specialist.  You can buy all the shakes, special measurement doohickeys, scales or more. At the end of the day it may not work for you.  A specialist is trained to assess your lifestyle, activity, likes/dislikes and more. If recommendations are made that can't come into fruition outside of the office, plans are tweaked. A specialist then focuses on motivation, how to hold you accountable, and when to integrate alternative therapies to solve a mystery and get to the end goal.

The time is now folks and a registered dietitian is the way to go. A trained professional who is good at their job will only recommend changes that are realistic. Realistic goals equal compliance. Compliance equals success.  There are many ways you can get assistance with expenses for nutrition counseling. If the group you want to work with does not take your insurance, ask for a Superbill so you can submit to your insurance company for reimbursement.  There is no such thing as failure, stop making that an excuse and if at first you don't succeed, try again. If you are interested in learning more check us out at www.kindrednutrition.com.  We are taking on new clients daily and would love to have you join our Kindred Community! I'm looking forward to hearing from you soon. Take this as your "sign." 

In Good Health,

Amy

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