Skip to main content

Food Trends: Macros Misconstrued

Oh Macros, how I love thee. You are the foundation of my nutrition recommendations. You should be individualized and different for everyone although you are "prescribed" routinely the same person to person. You are scientific, there is not a one size fits all, and frankly you are misunderstood.

A couple of years ago Macros started to become more popular in the www world when a brilliant someone decided to market magical macro percentages to induce weight loss, body massing, and everything else under the sun. The thought process is to start with grams of protein needs dependent on body weight, to then look at range of fats between 25-35% dependent on goals and body type, and to provide the remaining of your macro goals from carbohydrates.  How easy, especially since everyone has the same protein needs, insert sarcasm here.
A food label providing grams of fat, carbs, and protein

Right away many bought into this bullet proof hope and we now have too many folks determining and "prescribing" ratios for people who aren't qualified and more importantly aren't licensed to do so.  Does this mean it doesn't work? Absolutely not as most of the time any change provides results BUT it does mean you may need to tweak things significantly multiple times as you move through the guessing game, especially when their is no scientific assessment made prior to your "prescription".

Dietitians and dietitians only are experienced, licensed, and protected from a liability standpoint to assess current lifestyle, activity, body type, co-morbidity's, and exercise regimens and provide specific calorie goals.  Based off of a dietitian's trained assessment and potentially additional equipment such as a Resting Metabolic Rate or Body Fat machine,  they come up with recommendations for calories to maintain, gain, or lose weight. The calories are then made up specifically of % or grams of the macronutrients Carbohydrates, Protein, and Fat.

So many clients come into my office nowadays with their own research. Most come in telling me they follow a 40/30/30 macro diet or that they have been prescribed macros from My Fitness Pal. The fact of the matter is that the generic diet you have been prescribed comes from a generic calculation that doesn't take your body type, exercise regimen  lifestyles, or co-morbidity's into account. Most of these clients have some success to start but reach what they fear is a "set point" fairly quickly.

This is the problem. When you work off of a generic macronutrient percentage you are learning nothing about food, fuel, or your body's reaction to food. You are simply allowing yourself more flexibility to come up to a calorie number that someone prescribed from a generic calculation. Does it really make sense to eat 1 teaspoon of butter or some jelly beans at the end of the night just to hit your ratios?

Speaking of ratios, there is so much more to the generic macro ratio.  You really need to also look at the Carbohydrate to Protein ratio which is different for weight loss, weight gain, and maintenance, It is also different for my Runners & Triathletes and my Crossfitters and Body Builders, combine any of the two and boy are we getting complicated.

My point is macros are important but is the Macro diet the end all be all? It could be if you are working with the right person but most likely it's a means to provide more attention to your food and maybe that's all you need to do.

Bottom Line: Macros aren't Miraculous. Don't buy into the nonsense, especially if it's from someone who's not qualified to provide the recommendations.

In Good Health,

Amy







Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Spotlight: Changes to schedule, New Offerings, and More

Changes to  Hours:

Kindred Clients please note that our evening hours will change effective 4/11/2016.  Our Monday office hours will now be 2- 6:30 PM and our Wednesday hours will now be 2:00-6:00 PM.  Evening hours are reserved for children in school or for adults that do not have a flexible schedule.  Please note, these hours are in high demand and a cancellation may result in an inability for you to get back into the schedule for multiple weeks. 



Kindred Nutrition will now have LIMITED Friday hours from 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM. For now we will only be accepting new clients into these appointment slots.

Yoga

Starting 4/11/2016 Kindred Nutrition will host Yoga Therapy with Julie Hanson click here for more information.  To sign up please complete the information at the bottom of Julie's site or simply call 301-580-0008 to confirm.

Julie Hanson will also be teaching a Yoga for Everyone class on Tuesdays 11am-12 pm.  Click here for more information.  Kindred Nutrition will again host thi…

Nutrition Tips: Fat Isn't the Enemy (FITE)

We hear so much about carbs and protein.  Some people claim a high protein diet is the best way to lose weight, or there are people who insist everyone should only eat carbs from the low glycemic list. But fat doesn’t make the conversation much, and that’s because we all know we need to avoid it, right? Fat is evil.  Almost as despicable as gluten...but not quite. 
Dietary fat (I wish we could come up with a better word for this) is found in animal products - meats, dairy - yogurt, cheese, milk, and eggs, but we can also find it in nature with our nuts, seeds, and avocado.  Of course, our baked goods like muffins and cookies have fat are included in the ingredients to make them moist and tasty!  
Food companies have made it entirely POSSIBLE to eat a fat-free diet.  And why wouldn’t you want to? Fat (okay, I’m thinking of a new word now) has been demonized during the past few decades.  We’ve heard that eating too much fat, or any at all depending on who you listen to, will cause us to b…

Insightful Intern - Eating to Lose Weight

In order to lose weight, we often are told that energy out must be greater than energy in.   In other words, calories taken in must be less than the calories we use in all of our daily activities.  So, to lose weight we cut calories and try to increase activity.  (Granted, there is more to weight loss/maintenance than just an exchange in energy.  What if we cut too many calories or don’t eat enough?
Since I started at Kindred Nutrition, I’ve heard many of Amy’s or Dawn’s clients talk about how they’ve cut back on calories to lose weight but have hit a weight-loss plateau.  Many a time when a client discusses this occurrence, we eventually come to the conclusion that the client is not eating enough.  This probably sounds foreign but you do need to eat in order to lose weight!  If you’re not eating enough your body goes into “starvation mode.”   Then whenever you do eat your body automatically stores those calories as fat because it is worried that it is not going to get enough calorie…