Skip to main content

Guest Post: Introducing Kindred's newest Guest Blogger

As most of you know I am a big  fan of guest bloggers and am always looking for a way to communicate the right information to the Kindred Community.  I am feeling really excited to be able to introduce a new guest blogger.   Recently I met Angela Farris, a dietetic intern at the University of Maryland at College Park. I am excited for you to get to know her just as I have.  Angela will be appearing in guest blogs and helping out with some other very neat things with Kindred Nutrition and The Center for Intuitive Eating.  Check out her bio below and look for her first guest post September 29th.

Angela A. Farris Biosketch

Angela is a dietetic intern with the University of Maryland College Park. Her program emphasizes information management and communication enabling her to visit a variety of sites over the next year; including IT rotations at the Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion and the International Food Information Council. Prior to starting her dietetic internship Angela received her MA in Human Sciences from Hood College and her BS in Human Nutrition and Foods from West Virginia University. She has worked in the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and at Cakes for Cause, a non-profit organization operating the social enterprise Moxie Bakery & Café. Angela’s interests outside of nutrition include reading, cooking, practicing yoga, and blogging about her internship rotations at writenutrition.wordpress.com. You can also follow Angela on her journey to become a dietitian on Twitter @AngelaAFarris.

Join me in welcoming Angela to the Kindred Community

Comments

Kati said…
Welcome Angela! I can't wait to read your posts!

Popular posts from this blog

The Truth Behind Clean Eating

A quick trip to the grocery store or chain restaurant and you will likely be bombarded with the concept of “clean eating” foods that claim to be “organic”, “natural”, “non GMO”, and “gluten free”. There is also the laundry list of foods you should avoid such as high fructose corn syrup, processed foods, and various toxins or chemicals. As a consumer it can be very overwhelming and intimidating to choose which foods are best for you.
While clean eating is not a new sensation, it has become increasingly popular in part due to misinformation on social media. Fear mongering is the latest marketing strategy in which companies are deliberately arousing fear in consumers to help sell their product. For example, products claim to be non-GMO when in fact it is not produced as a GMO food in the first place. There are only 8 genetically modified crops commercially prepared in the U.S. Products that have never contained gluten have a “Gluten free” label on them. Then there is the irrational conce…

A Note to Self before "Bathing Suit Season"

We are coming up on Memorial Day Weekend. The pools will open, beach season begins, and everyone is scurrying around to buy new bathing suits or cover ups. Although I LOVE summer there's an aspect of this time of year that I very much dislike.  I absolutely cannot stand the insecurity bathing suits bring to the mind. How many of your friends' Facebook and Instagram posts read "Gotta get bikini ready" or "I'm not ready for bathing suit season?" It's on everyone's minds and we have much better things to worry about people.

The fact of the matter is that MOST people feel vulnerable in a bathing suit. Think about it you are practically naked and I'm pretty sure the woman whose body modeled your final product may have had longer legs or is 15 years old.

Is it really worth allowing yourself to feel vulnerable and insecure over something that realistically isn't even created to showcase your body's strengths?  What in the world does how yo…

You are what you eat BUT it takes longer than a day!

Recent research by Cornell University published a week ago in the New England Journal of Medicine proves that holiday weight gain does happen and most of it is from October to about ten days after Christmas.  The study analyzed 3,000 individuals over a years time focusing on daily weights that were collected and analyzed by a wireless Withings Scale.

Although the average weight gain from October to November was only 1.3 pounds this may prove that holiday weight gain is not a myth. Of interest, the study also showed that fifty percent lost the weight shortly after the holiday season while it took the other fifty percent about five months to lose the excess weight, shortly after Easter.
Author Dr. Wansink advises “Instead of a New Year’s resolution to lose weight, have an October resolution not to gain too much weight in the first place. Then you won’t have to worry about five months of struggling."
At Kindred Nutrition we tend to agree with Dr. Wansink's advice.  Our society is s…